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2022 flood summer update

Flooded boathouse sits on the shore of the Winnipeg River.

High water on the Winnipeg River this summer damaged docks and boathouses.

Enlarge image: Flooded boathouse sits on the shore of the Winnipeg River.

Record precipitation across southern Manitoba this spring, especially in the Winnipeg River and Red River watersheds, continues to flow into Lake Winnipeg, and through the Nelson River to Hudson Bay.

Winnipeg River flows reached the highest-ever recorded and are expected to remain high all summer as water flows from Lake of the Woods and Lac Seul upstream. See Lake of the Woods Control Board for more information.

The Seven Sisters generating station spillways run high water.

Spillway at the Seven Sisters Generating Station.

Enlarge image: The Seven Sisters generating station spillways run high water.

Floodwaters flowing into Lake Winnipeg have raised the level of the lake 5 feet since last fall to rival levels experienced during the previous 2011 flood.

Lake Winnipeg water levels will be high all summer – the lake is expected to remain at its current peak level through July and to gradually recede into the fall. The risk for shoreline properties from wind storms on Lake Winnipeg is high.

Manitoba Hydro, through the Lake Winnipeg Regulation Project, is flowing as much water as possible out of Lake Winnipeg to the Nelson River. River flows and lake levels on the Nelson River will also be high all summer and into the fall. Manitoba Hydro is working with the numerous communities on the Nelson River waterway affected by these extreme flows and levels.

Read up-to-date water level and flow information.