Converter stations

A lot of Manitoba’s electricity is produced by our northern hydroelectric generating stations on the Nelson River. The electricity travels long distances on bipole transmission lines to southern Manitoba as high-voltage direct current.

It is more efficient and economical to transmit electricity as high-voltage direct current. Our northern converter stations change alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) for transmission, and our southern converter stations then change it back to AC.

Dorsey

Dorsey converter station is in Rosser and is the southern end point for Bipoles I and II. Over 70% of electricity produced in Manitoba is transmitted through Dorsey.

Dorsey received its first transmission from Bipole I in June 1972.

The converter station was named after Professor John Dorsey, who taught electrical engineering at the University of Manitoba from 1912 to 1952. Professor Dorsey was well known for his work on electrical transmission.

Henday

Henday converter station is north of Gillam and is the northern end point of Bipole II.

Henday first transmitted energy in October 1978 as part of Bipole II.

The station was named after Anthony Henday, an 18th century trader who worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company.

Keewatinohk

Keewatinohk converter station is northeast of Gillam and is the northern end point of Bipole III. Pronounced Kee-way-tin-oohk, the word is Cree for the north.

Keewatinohk first transmitted energy in April 2018 as part of Bipole III.

Radisson

Radisson converter station is north of Gillam and is the northern end point for Bipole I.

Radisson first transmitted energy in March 1971 as part of Bipole I.

Riel

Riel converter station is located east of Winnipeg. It is the southern end point for Bipole III.

Riel received its first transmission from Bipole III in July 2018.

Transmission explained

Learn more about transmission and its valuable role in delivering the reliable, affordable energy you count on.